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Already taken the SAT?

How do admission officers interpret your score?

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How are my scores interpreted??

Different colleges evaluate multiple SAT scores in different ways. Some will take your highest scores, even if they were earned on different test dates. So if you nailed the math portion in March and the critical reading portion in October, they will combine those two numbers to maximize your overall score. Not bad, eh? But many other schools don’t do that. Some may pay most attention to your highest overall score on a single exam. Many others will average all of your scores or lend equal weight to all of them.

So what does this mean? It means that you should only take the SAT when you are truly prepared. Because no matter what each school’s individual policy tends to be, every single SAT score you receive is part of your permanent transcript, so colleges see them all. Ideally, you should try to earn your “goal score” sooner rather than later. For example, a student who hits his or her objective of 1700 in one sitting certainly has an advantage over a student who needed five tries to squeeze out a 1700.

There is nothing wrong with taking the SAT two or three times. As a matter of fact, it is quite common, particularly for students who don’t prepare professionally. However, you should be confident that your score will improve substantially each time you take the exam. Let’s say that you scored a 1880 on your first SAT. If you would have been thrilled to have hit 1900, it’s probably not worth taking again. Most colleges look at SAT scores in ranges and will not hold 20 points against an applicant. They understand that scoring 1880 means that you were only one or two questions away from 1900; and no sane admission officer would deny you admission based on one or two questions! But if you scored 1880 and expected to score closer to 2100 or 2150 based on practice testing or to reach your goal score, then you should probably take the exam again. In other words, it is of little value to take the SAT multiple times if you expect to earn roughly the same score. But it is worthwhile if you expect to score significantly higher on a second or third try. For more advice about this, talk to your AcerLogic Instructor or an AcerLogic Admission Counselor.

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